Event Title

Aereo and Public Performance Rights Panel

Location

Lincoln Hall, Northwestern University School of Law

Start Date

28-2-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

28-2-2014 2:45 PM

Description

Please join us for a panel discussing the Aereo case and the public performance right of copyright law. Our distinguished panelists are as follows:

Peter DiCola is an associate professor of law at Northwestern University. He received both his J.D. and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. His dissertation was about regulation of the radio and music industries. While in graduate school, he worked with the Future of Music Coalition as director of economic analysis from 2000–2004 and served as full-time research director from 2005–2006; he remains on the organization’s board of directors. After law school, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable Thomas L. Ambro of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. He is the co-author of Creative License: The Law and Culture of Digital Sampling with Kembrew McLeod (University of Iowa), published by Duke University Press in 2011. His recent work concerns the regulation of digital music services and the ways musicians earn revenue.

Steve Effros has been deeply involved in telecommunications policy and practice for the past 40 years. Following stints at ABC and NBC Network News and The New York Times, Effros graduated with honors from NYU Law School (’70) and became part of the five-person FCC legal team which drafted the 1972 set of original comprehensive federal rules regulating cable television. He participated in the negotiation and drafting of portions of the comprehensive Copyright Act of 1976, the Cable Communications Acts of 1984 and 1992, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He has been involved in the legislative and regulatory policy development of cable and broadband technology ever since.

Steve spent five years at the FCC as an attorney-advisor and then became partner in the telecommunications Law Firm of Brown & Effros. In 1976 he became head of the Washington, DC based association representing independent cable television operators, The Cable Telecommunications Association (CATA). He was President of the association for 23 years. CATA merged with the National Cable and Telecommunications Association (NCTA) in 1999. Through Effros Communications and Stephen R. Effros, PC, he has acted as a consultant, advisor, analyst and weekly trade press columnist ever since. He is also a Principal in Beyond Broadband Technology LLC (BBT), a high-technology company developing a unique, newly patented method of establishing a secure communications path for voice, video and data services.

Effros was on the cable television and telecommunications teaching faculty of the Practicing Law Institute (PLI) for over ten years, and has been an Adjunct Professor on telecommunications policy at George Mason University. He has spoken both nationally and internationally on cable television and telecommunications issues since the 1970's.

Jane C. Ginsburg is the Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at Columbia University School of Law, and Director of its Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts. She teaches Legal Methods, Copyright Law, and Trademarks Law, and is the author or co-author of casebooks in all three subjects. With Professor Robert A. Gorman, she is the co-author of Copyright: Concepts and Insights (Foundation Press 2012), and with Professor Sam Ricketson, of International Copyright and Neighbouring Rights: The Berne Convention and Beyond (Oxford University Press 2006). Other books include several volumes on domestic or international copyright and trademark law. With Professor Dreyfuss and Professor François Dessemontet, she was a Co-Reporter for the American Law Institute project on Intellectual Property: Principles Governing Jurisdiction, Choice of Law and Judgments in Transnational Disputes (2008).

A graduate of the University of Chicago (BA 1976, MA 1977), Professor Ginsburg received a JD in 1980 from Harvard, and a Diplôme d'études approfondies in 1985 and a Doctorate of Law in 1995 from the University of Paris II. She is a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, a Member of the American Philosophical Society, and an Honorary Fellow of Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge.

Andy Goldstein is a Partner in the Corporate Practice Group of Freeborn & Peters LLP.

Andy focuses his practice in the area of Intellectual Property and Information Technology. He has extensive experience in the areas of intellectual property law, including trademark, trade dress and copyright law; internet, website, cloud computing, technology, outsourcing and computer law in general; advertising, marketing, and promotion law; and entertainment law, including video production, theater and dance- related matters.

Matthew Sag is a Professor of Law at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Professor Sag has also taught at DePaul University, Northwestern University and the University of Virginia.

Prior to his academic career, Professor Sag practiced as an intellectual property lawyer in the United Kingdom with Arnold & Porter and in Silicon Valley, California with Skadden, Arps. He earned his law degree with honors from the Australian National University and clerked for Justice Paul Finn of the Federal Court of Australia.

Professor Sag's research focuses on the intersection of law and technology. Professor Sag's works have been published in leading journals such as the California Law Review, the Northwestern Review and the Georgetown Law Journal. Professor Sag's research on copyright and fair use has been widely cited in academic works, judicial opinions and government reports.

American Broadcasting Companies Inc v AEREO Inc-1.pdf (282 kB)
American Broadcasting v. Aereo

WNET Thirteen v Aereo Inc.rtf (1122 kB)
WNET Thirteen v. Aereo

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Feb 28th, 1:30 PM Feb 28th, 2:45 PM

Aereo and Public Performance Rights Panel

Lincoln Hall, Northwestern University School of Law

Please join us for a panel discussing the Aereo case and the public performance right of copyright law. Our distinguished panelists are as follows:

Peter DiCola is an associate professor of law at Northwestern University. He received both his J.D. and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. His dissertation was about regulation of the radio and music industries. While in graduate school, he worked with the Future of Music Coalition as director of economic analysis from 2000–2004 and served as full-time research director from 2005–2006; he remains on the organization’s board of directors. After law school, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable Thomas L. Ambro of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. He is the co-author of Creative License: The Law and Culture of Digital Sampling with Kembrew McLeod (University of Iowa), published by Duke University Press in 2011. His recent work concerns the regulation of digital music services and the ways musicians earn revenue.

Steve Effros has been deeply involved in telecommunications policy and practice for the past 40 years. Following stints at ABC and NBC Network News and The New York Times, Effros graduated with honors from NYU Law School (’70) and became part of the five-person FCC legal team which drafted the 1972 set of original comprehensive federal rules regulating cable television. He participated in the negotiation and drafting of portions of the comprehensive Copyright Act of 1976, the Cable Communications Acts of 1984 and 1992, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He has been involved in the legislative and regulatory policy development of cable and broadband technology ever since.

Steve spent five years at the FCC as an attorney-advisor and then became partner in the telecommunications Law Firm of Brown & Effros. In 1976 he became head of the Washington, DC based association representing independent cable television operators, The Cable Telecommunications Association (CATA). He was President of the association for 23 years. CATA merged with the National Cable and Telecommunications Association (NCTA) in 1999. Through Effros Communications and Stephen R. Effros, PC, he has acted as a consultant, advisor, analyst and weekly trade press columnist ever since. He is also a Principal in Beyond Broadband Technology LLC (BBT), a high-technology company developing a unique, newly patented method of establishing a secure communications path for voice, video and data services.

Effros was on the cable television and telecommunications teaching faculty of the Practicing Law Institute (PLI) for over ten years, and has been an Adjunct Professor on telecommunications policy at George Mason University. He has spoken both nationally and internationally on cable television and telecommunications issues since the 1970's.

Jane C. Ginsburg is the Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at Columbia University School of Law, and Director of its Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts. She teaches Legal Methods, Copyright Law, and Trademarks Law, and is the author or co-author of casebooks in all three subjects. With Professor Robert A. Gorman, she is the co-author of Copyright: Concepts and Insights (Foundation Press 2012), and with Professor Sam Ricketson, of International Copyright and Neighbouring Rights: The Berne Convention and Beyond (Oxford University Press 2006). Other books include several volumes on domestic or international copyright and trademark law. With Professor Dreyfuss and Professor François Dessemontet, she was a Co-Reporter for the American Law Institute project on Intellectual Property: Principles Governing Jurisdiction, Choice of Law and Judgments in Transnational Disputes (2008).

A graduate of the University of Chicago (BA 1976, MA 1977), Professor Ginsburg received a JD in 1980 from Harvard, and a Diplôme d'études approfondies in 1985 and a Doctorate of Law in 1995 from the University of Paris II. She is a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, a Member of the American Philosophical Society, and an Honorary Fellow of Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge.

Andy Goldstein is a Partner in the Corporate Practice Group of Freeborn & Peters LLP.

Andy focuses his practice in the area of Intellectual Property and Information Technology. He has extensive experience in the areas of intellectual property law, including trademark, trade dress and copyright law; internet, website, cloud computing, technology, outsourcing and computer law in general; advertising, marketing, and promotion law; and entertainment law, including video production, theater and dance- related matters.

Matthew Sag is a Professor of Law at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Professor Sag has also taught at DePaul University, Northwestern University and the University of Virginia.

Prior to his academic career, Professor Sag practiced as an intellectual property lawyer in the United Kingdom with Arnold & Porter and in Silicon Valley, California with Skadden, Arps. He earned his law degree with honors from the Australian National University and clerked for Justice Paul Finn of the Federal Court of Australia.

Professor Sag's research focuses on the intersection of law and technology. Professor Sag's works have been published in leading journals such as the California Law Review, the Northwestern Review and the Georgetown Law Journal. Professor Sag's research on copyright and fair use has been widely cited in academic works, judicial opinions and government reports.