Event Title

Technology, Government Surveillance, and the Fourth Amendment

Location

Northwestern University School of Law

Start Date

24-2-2012 2:00 PM

End Date

24-2-2012 3:20 PM

Description

Panelists will discuss the intersection of technological development and criminal law in light of cases such as United States v. Jones, addressing whether the government can legally use advances in technology to track citizens without a warrant for lengthy periods of time. Questions posed to the panels will include whether the government can tap into information gathered by wireless providers without a warrant and in the face of an affirmative desire not to be tracked, whether the phone companies should be held liable, and whether society accepts such background risks by opting into using new technologies.

PANELISTS:

Cindy Cohn is the Legal Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation as well as its General Counsel. She has considerable expertise with NSA Spying and online privacy.

Stephan Leckar successfully argued the case of U.S. v. Jones before the Supreme Court. The case centered around whether or not placement of a GPS device on an automobile without probable cause was considered a search under the Fourth Amendment.

Adam Schwartz is a Staff Attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois. He specializes in cases involving police practices.

Jason Weinstein was appointed in May 2009 to be a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Department of Justice’s Criminal Division, where he oversees the Division’s computer crime and intellectual property programs, as well as its violent crime, organized crime, and human rights programs.

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Feb 24th, 2:00 PM Feb 24th, 3:20 PM

Technology, Government Surveillance, and the Fourth Amendment

Northwestern University School of Law

Panelists will discuss the intersection of technological development and criminal law in light of cases such as United States v. Jones, addressing whether the government can legally use advances in technology to track citizens without a warrant for lengthy periods of time. Questions posed to the panels will include whether the government can tap into information gathered by wireless providers without a warrant and in the face of an affirmative desire not to be tracked, whether the phone companies should be held liable, and whether society accepts such background risks by opting into using new technologies.

PANELISTS:

Cindy Cohn is the Legal Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation as well as its General Counsel. She has considerable expertise with NSA Spying and online privacy.

Stephan Leckar successfully argued the case of U.S. v. Jones before the Supreme Court. The case centered around whether or not placement of a GPS device on an automobile without probable cause was considered a search under the Fourth Amendment.

Adam Schwartz is a Staff Attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois. He specializes in cases involving police practices.

Jason Weinstein was appointed in May 2009 to be a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Department of Justice’s Criminal Division, where he oversees the Division’s computer crime and intellectual property programs, as well as its violent crime, organized crime, and human rights programs.