Francis Crijns


The European Community finds itself in a state of almost permanent crisis as the process of integration continues to stagnate; all of its noble objectives still be be realized; and since 1958, bedevilled with many new problems, especially in the areas of environmental and energy policy. Furthermore, the socio-economic sitaution has changed fundamentally with the enlargement of the Community to ten member states in 1981 which has weakened rather then strengthened the possibliities to cope with these difficulties. In addition to these general considerations, institutional factors, such as the procedures according to which decisions are made in the Communities and the role of the Council, the Commission and the European Parliament also contribute to this state of malaise.