James A. Rahl


American antitrust policy in foreign commerce is once again under the pressure of complaints from at home and abroad.' It may seem anomalous that laws intended to protect competition are charged with impairing American "competitiveness," but that is the contention heard in Congress and in business quarters.2 Meanwhile, some foreign nations, including a few who have recently enacted new antitrust laws of their own, complain that our antitrust laws are too aggressive.3 Given the large amount of current discussion and the number of different proposals in Congress, careful study of the issues and of possi- ble solutions is certainly indicated.